PCAL Evidence Papers

Development and Active Living

Addressing active living and healthy eating through council’s Integrated Planning and Reporting Framework: A guide prepared by the NSW Premier’s Council for Active Living (PCAL)

This web resource provides guidance to councils (and other interested parties) on how to address active living and healthy eating principles and practices, as they implement, monitor and review their Integrated Planning and Reporting (IP&R) frameworks. This Guide is an updated version of Addressing Active Living through Councils' Integrated Planning and Reporting framework (2010), revised and extended to cover healthy eating. It is based on legislative requirements, the NSW OLG IP&R Manual (2013), analysis of documents from council case studies, and interviews and follow-up correspondence with key council staff members. The full resource is summarised in a brochure entitled Active Living and Healthy Eating: Integrated Planning & Reporting Framework – A Guide for Local Councils.

 

Development and Active Living: Designing Projects for Active Living – Developer’s Checklist with Case Studies

The Developer’s Checklist is a companion document to the PCAL Designing Projects for Active Living Resource (below). It is a best practice, voluntary resource for developers to self assess their development, provide a useful starting point for discussions with Consent Authorities, and respond to policy directions outlined in the NSW Department of Planning Position Statement: Planning for Active Living. A version of the checklist document that does not include active living case studies is also available for developers to download, fill out and include as part of a Development Application.

 

Development and Active Living: Designing Project's for Active Living - A Development Assessment Resource & Navigational Tool

To provide guidance for the NSW Department of Planning and councils on building Active Living provisions into Local Environment Plans and Development Control Plans as well as specific advice on major Development Applications, the NSW Premier’s Council for Active Living (PCAL) has produced 'Development and Active Living.' This resource provides active living design and siting advice for six NSW planning system development types, active living related advice applying to all types of development and example Conditions of Consent promoting active living outcomes.

 

Active Travel

 

NSW Travelsmart Schools Program 2006-2007 Summary Report

The NSW Travelsmart Schools Program aimed to reduce car use and to encourage active travel (walking, cycling and/or public transport) to and from school by students and their parents at 15 primary schools in the inner west and eastern suburbs of Sydney. The program took place from February 2006 to September 2007 and represented a collaboration between NSW health, transport, planning and environment agencies. The Summary Report confirms parent journey to work is a key factor that influences parents' decisions on how they and their children travel to and from school and concludes that the goals and strategies of active travel to school programs should be extended to include active travel to parents' workplaces. A series of subsequent recommendations is also provided.

 

Children

 

Guidelines for using contracted external providers for physical education and school sport

PCAL has developed guidelines to help school Principals (or relevant people) decide whether or not they want to hire an external provider to enhance physical education and sport provision within their school. If they choose to engage an external provider, the guidelines may also be used by Principals to make decisions about which provider to select. There are four parts to the Guidelines: Background, choosing a provider, responsibilities of the school and further information.

 

Guidelines for using external providers for physical activity in Out of School Hours (OOSH) centres

PCAL has developed guidelines to assist NSW OOSH centres which plan to engage an external provider to deliver formal physical activity programs. The guidelines are also meant to assist management committees/coordinators to inform their decisions about whether or not to select an external provider. There are four parts to the Guidelines: Background, choosing a provider, responsibilities of the OOSH centre and further information.

 

Community Development

 

Guidelines for the use of Physical Activity for Community Development Purposes

To support the efforts of the NSW Government, the business sector and the community to deliver 'best practice', evidence-based, physical activity/active living programs which strengthen community engagement and build social capital, the NSW Premier's Council for Active Living (PCAL) has developed Recommended Guidelines for the use of Physical Activity for Community Development Purposes.

 

Practitioner's Resource

A concise practitioner's resource has been developed to assist practitioners plan, implement and evaluate physical activity programs that build social capital in communities. The resource has been designed for use in a multiplicity of applications including program and policy settings and at grassroots delivery of physical activity or community development programs.

 

Physical Activity & Building Stronger Communities

This report was commissioned by PCAL as part of the development of guidelines for the use of physical activity for community development purposes. The report reviews the formal literature relating to the role of physical activity in building stronger communities. The review outlines the health benefits of physical activity and how participation in physical activity may help foster social capital and encourage the development of strong and healthy communities.

 

Cycling in NSW

 

The NSW Government is implementing a wide range of actions to improve cycling infrastructure and encourage bike-riding. Cycling programs are also being reviewed as part of work on a new Long Term Transport Master Plan for NSW. A series of background studies were previously prepared regarding cycling in NSW:

 

Healthy Planning

 

A as in Active: Incorporating Active Living Principles within Planning

The built environment is one of a range of important variables which influences people’s physical activity levels. While research to date has not shown any causal relationship between physical environment characteristics and participation in physical activity, good associations have been demonstrated. At the macro level factors such as medium to high residential densities, connectivity between home, work, shopping, recreation and public transport, and land use mix are supportive of physical activity. At the micro level the presence of pedestrian and bicycling facilities, pleasant street conditions, and perceptions around the neighbourhood being a safe and enjoyable place in which to be are important.

Information relating to healthy planning processes was presented within the Planning Institute of Australia (NSW Division) quarterly magazine, April 2007.

 

Project Report: Creating Liveable Communities in the Lower Hunter Region

Hunter New England Population Health, with funding from the University of Newcastle Research Associates (TUNRA) has completed (June 2007) the Liveable Communities Project and subsequent project report. This urban development project set out to identify key components in building liveable communities in the Lower Hunter Region of NSW and to develop a locally designed resource to assist both planning and development industries in creating liveable communities. The research was informed by evidence and local stakeholder and community need that revealed a number of principles and key elements of a liveable community upon which the resource was based.

 

Building Liveable Communities in the Lower Hunter Region

Hunter New England Population Health, with funding from the University of Newcastle Research Associates (TUNRA) has developed (March 2007) a locally-designed resource to assist both planning and development industries in creating liveable communities. Building Liveable Communities in the Lower Hunter Region is based on the four guiding principles of accessibility, connectivity, sustainability and flexibility and breaks down each principle into key elements with related design suggestions. The resource can also be used to help determine the social and health outcomes of proposed developments.

 

The CHESS Principles for Healthy Environments: An holistic and strategic game-plan for inter-sectoral policy and action

This paper presents the CHESS principles for healthy environments. This is a comprehensive schema which enables professionals to work inter-sectorally and collaboratively to strategically devise policy and subsequent actions for wellbeing. Simply stated as different environments which underpin the achievement of healthy people, places and planet, CHESS encompasses the following:

  • Connected Environments
  • Healthy Eating Environments
  • Safe Environments
  • Sustainable Environments

 

Development and Active Living: Designing Project's for Active Living - A Development Assessment Resource & Navigational Tool

To provide guidance for the NSW Department of Planning and councils on building Active Living provisions into Local Environment Plans and Development Control Plans as well as specific advice on major Development Applications, the NSW Premier’s Council for Active Living (PCAL) has produced 'Development and Active Living.' This resource provides active living design and siting advice for six NSW planning system development types, active living related advice applying to all types of development and example Conditions of Consent promoting active living outcomes.

 

Supportive Environments: utilising the NSW Planning system to enable active living

 

Healthy Built Environments quarterly column in the NSW Planning Institute of Australia's journal New Planner

 

2016

McCue P, Thompson SM, "Healthy Built Environments - FitNSW: Helping to reduce childhood obesity rates", June 2016, 28

Thompson SM, McCue P, 'Healthy Built Environments - Resilience through healthy planning', March 2016: 20-1

 

2015

McCue, P, Thompson SM, "Healthy Built Environments - Progressing the Agenda in a Year of Change, Challenge and Opportunity", December 2015: 25

Thompson SM, McCue P, 'Healthy Built Environments - Making Public Places for a Healthy City', September 2015: 28-9

McCue P, Thompson SM, 'Healthy Built Environments - Sharing the Path', June 2015: 31

Thompson SM, McCue P, 'Healthy Built Environments - The Politics of Bringing Health into Planning', March 2015: 27

 

2014

Thompson SM, McCue P, 'Healthy Built Environments - Let's Get Walking: The Legacy of Sydney's Walk21 Conference', December 2014: 27

Thompson SM, McCue P, 'Healthy Built Environments - Looking Forward to the Healthy City', September 2014: 37

McCue P, Thompson SM, 'Healthy Built Environments - Designing Urban Activation Centres for Healthy Communities', June 2014: 26

Thompson SM, McCue P, 'Healthy Built Environments - Making our towns and cities walkable', March 2014: 29

 

PCAL Submissions

 

PCAL's submission in response to the Our Cities Discussion Paper.

PCAL's submission in response to the Metropolitan Strategy Review Sydney Towards 2036 and the Metropolitan Transport Plan.

PCAL's submission in response to the Draft Metropolitan Strategy for Sydney 2031.

PCAL's submission  to the NSW Planning System Review recommends a suite of changes to promote health and wellbeing.

PCAL's submission in response to the NSW Planning System Review Issues Paper.

PCAL's submission in response to the NSW Planning System Review Green Paper.

PCAL's submission in response to the NSW Planning System Review White Paper.

PCAL's submission to Austroads recommending the inclusion of health benefit calculations within Australian major transport appraisal processes.

 

Why Active Living Statement

 

Why Active Living Statement

There is a rapidly growing body of evidence which demonstrates that being active in everyday life not only has substantial positive impacts on our health, but also has potential environmental, social and economic benefits. To assist and support leaders in the public, private and community sectors to make decisions that will facilitate and encourage active living, PCAL has summarised in this Active Living Statement the key evidence demonstrating the benefits of active living and the individual and social costs of a sedentary lifestyle.

 

Workplace Travel Plan

PCAL Workplace Travel Plan Resource: Final Report April 2010

PCAL has developed a NSW specific Workplace Travel Plan (WTP) Resource. This report includes the background, rationale and stakeholders involved in the development of the resource. The aim of the PCAL WTP Resource is to facilitate the development and implemenation of best practice WTPs across the State. The Resource provides a concise summary of how to commence a WTP and signposting to key relevant international and national implementation resources. PCAL has developed a web version of the resource.